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Getting rid of aphids on roses

September 29, 2014 | Filed under Soul food

Aphids are tiny green insects that love the soft new growth on rose bushes.  They tend to cluster around the new buds and chew away the flower bud and stem.

Before they spread too much you can remove them by squashing them between your finger and thumb.

Or spray them with a hose to wash them off.  You will need a hose nozzle that gives a strong spray. Do this every day for up to a week till the aphids are washed off the soil (or been dealt to by the good garden insects).

You can also make an organic spray with:

2 drops of dish washing detergent
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cooking oil of any kind
1 teaspoon salt

  1. Put all items in a 24 oz. S(700ml) spray bottle.
  2. Fill spray bottle with cold water.
  3. Spray the aphids.

Enjoy your aphid free roses.

 

Roses – organic control of black spot and powdery mildew

April 25, 2013 | Filed under Soul food

Baking soda is a godsend in the kitchen and laundry but is less well known as an organic control of rose diseases, especially powdery mildew and black spot.  Try this baking soda spray on your roses.  …Read more

Planting new rose bushes

July 6, 2012 | Filed under Soul food

Winter is the best time to plant new roses.  This is because the plants are bare of leaves and will grow stronger if planted at this stage.  There will be a good variety in garden centres right now. …Read more

Pruning Roses

July 4, 2012 | Filed under Soul food

Roses are pruned in the winter to:

  • to remove dead, old and diseased stems,
  • to keep the bushes to a manageable size
  • and to encourage the development of new growth.

When you prune will depend on your local mini-climate. Experience will soon show you your best time. …Read more

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