Quick bread rolls

April 12, 2010 | Filed under: Breakfast / Brunch

These bread rolls really are quick to make – not much more than an hour if the dough rises really quickly.   You can make them in the morning so they are ready for lunch or a late breakfast at the weekend.

Ingredients

1 cup warm water (blood heat – approximately 37°C)
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoon dried yeast (or 20 grams fresh yeast)
2 cups white flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup extra flour

Method

  1. Measure the warm water into a small bowl.
  2. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.
  3. Sprinkle the yeast over the surface of the water.  Leave in a warm place for 10 minutes until the mixture is frothy.
  4. Sift the flour and salt into a warm bowl. Stir the frothy yeast mixture well then pour into the flour. Beat well with a wooden spoon.
  5. Cover the bowl with a wet teatowel or plastic film and leave in a warm place for 10 minutes.
  6. Stir the mixture till you have a soft dough (not sticky, not dry and crumbly).  If sticky, add more flour a tablespoon at a time.  If too dry, add up to 1 tablespoon milk, a little at a time.
  7. Tip on to a floured board and knead for 5 minutes.
  8. The kneading process is a fold, push and turn movement.  Fold the far side of the dough towards you with your left hand, then press down with the heel of your right hand and push the dough away from you.  Give the dough a quarter turn and repeat until the dough is no longer sticky.
  9. To test if the dough is kneaded enough, dent the dough with a finger.  When ready, the dent will fill in so you can just see where the dent was.
  10. To make the rolls, break off 12 evenly sized pieces of dough and roll into balls.
  11. Place the balls on a warm greased oven tray or warm greased muffin pans. Brush with milk to glaze.
  12. Cover with a wet tea towel or plastic film and leave to rise in a warm place for about 10 minutes or until about doubled in size.
  13. Bake in a hot oven at 220°C for 10-15 minutes.

Makes 12 rolls

Notes:

The key to making these rolls quickly (1- 1 ½ hours including rising time) is the warmth incorporated during the process. This speeds up the work the yeast does in the bread rising process

To warm the bowl, pour in hot water, tip the water out and dry the bowl thoroughly.

A warm place is a sunny window sill or kitchen bench, the oven at 50°C or the hot water cupboard

Blood heat – this is your body temperature (37°C ) and the water should not feel much hotter or colder than your skin.  Test on the inside of your wrist as you do when testing the temperature of milk for a baby’s bottle.

The kneading process incorporates air into the dough and helps to make a light easy-to-eat roll.

Tags: , ,

Comments (6)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

Sites That Link to this Post

  1. Cloverleaf rolls | April 8, 2011
  1. Dylan says:

    Fresh yeast can be purchased at Moore Wilsons for next to nothing, I think I payed $3.50 for a big block of it

  2. admin says:

    I’m delighted to find out about this as I’ve used dried yeast for years because I didn’t know fresh yeast could still be sourced. Doh! why did I not think about the supermarket bakery. New World Waikanae here I come.

    This might be a useful tip for the ginger beer brewers. Are you guys listening?

  3. cynthia says:

    I used to make a lot of bread and related products using compressed (fresh) yeast. I have searched the internet but there doesn’t appear to be anything available on the North Shore, Auckland. Can you please advise????

    • Judy says:

      I’ve heard that some of the Auckland supermarkets sell fresh yeast from their bakery. I checked out with my local in Wellington and they are happy to sell fresh yeast to customers in any size you want. So I suggest you check out the bakery at your local supermarket and see how you get on.

  4. Julie says:

    Thanks for this recipe. It was a hit with the whole family, who all had a second helping!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *